Pöytä koreaksi

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muovailuvaha pöytälevylle

a project for reading?

One more quotation from Peter Middleton, distanced from its context:

“a willingness to take the projects of the text, as they realize themselves in the reader’s present, forward into some future, not passively but as an active reader who both challenges them and experiences their force.
To do this is to read forward, to recognize the imperatives of distance in distant reading.”
(Middleton Peter 2005. Distant Reading: Performance, Readership, and Consumption in Contemporary Poetry. Tuscaloosa: The University of Alabama Press.)

— a principle that one might want to see put to use in reading… poems or smaller units within them.

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asemineen 1

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books/reading?

“The literary book as a singular object also hinders recognition of the workings of readership because it acts as an obvious icon of both autonomous authorship and autonomous reading, the latter a strong illusion despite the fact that there are usually many other coeval copies, some even being coevally read, so that the text’s cultural work can take place only in isolated pockets that become aware of each other over time, if at all. In practice, the encompassing literary field or movement can partially function like this—one novel is answered by another, magazines provide reviews and letters that can at least represent aspects of collective response—a process that is rarely representative or democratic.” (Middleton Peter 2005. Distant Reading: Performance, Readership, and Consumption in Contemporary Poetry. Tuscaloosa: The University of Alabama Press. p. 147)

writing as reading? #1

“If you do not know what reading can be, you might as well use the pages of the Iliad for the purpose for which newspaper is used after a meal in the woods [by Thoreau, who wrapped his bread in newspaper and read it after eating]. If, however, you are prepared to read, then a fragment of newspaper, discovered words, are sufficient promptings, bespeaking distant and kindred lives and deaths. The events in a newspaper, our current lives, are epic, and point morals, if we know how to interpret them. The words of the Iliad should come to us as immediately as election results or rumors of war.” (Stanley Cavell: Senses of Walden, 1972: 67)

(“One can say that newspapers, incapable of seizing the insignificance of the everyday, are able to render its value apprehensible only by declaring it sensational; … The everyday escapes.”)
(Maurice Blanchot: Infinite Conversation [1969] 2003: 243-244)

“As the writer must establish or create his mode of presence to the word, he must admit or create the reader’s mode of presence to it. It is the ground upon which they will meet.” (Cavell 1972: 61).

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